Court of Appeal rules Government’s plan to deport asylum seekers to Rwanda ‘unlawful’ and ‘unsafe’

Three judges have overturned a ruling, which previously said Rwanda could be considered a ‘safe third country’.
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Campaigners have won a Court of Appeal challenge over the government’s planned Rwanda deportation scheme. Three judges have overturned a ruling, which previously said Rwanda could be considered a ‘safe third country’.

The High Court has ruled that the government’s controversial plan to deport migrants to the east Africa country was lawful in December 2022. However, just a month later it issued an appeal against its own judgement, which gave campaigners and asylum seekers a chance to renew their legal fight.

The Rwanda deportation scheme was introduced under Boris Johnson but has since been pushed forward by his successors as they plan to tackle small boat crossings in the Channel. However, due to a series of legal challenges, no one has been sent to the east African nation under the £120m deal struck over a year ago.

The High Court has today confirmed that three fresh inquests will take place into the deaths of Arthur Denis Brian Cunningham, Gladys Mabel Richards and Robert Wilson who all died at Gosport War Memorial Hospital in Hampshire in 1998.The High Court has today confirmed that three fresh inquests will take place into the deaths of Arthur Denis Brian Cunningham, Gladys Mabel Richards and Robert Wilson who all died at Gosport War Memorial Hospital in Hampshire in 1998.
The High Court has today confirmed that three fresh inquests will take place into the deaths of Arthur Denis Brian Cunningham, Gladys Mabel Richards and Robert Wilson who all died at Gosport War Memorial Hospital in Hampshire in 1998.

Campaigners have said the scheme is "cruel and will cause great human suffering", and have fought through the courts to stop it from happening. But the government argues the current system "incentivises" people to make journeys across the Channel and doing nothing is "not an option".

The latest ruling could see a further uphill battle if it is taken to the Supreme Court and after that, the European Court of Human Rights.