Reported fly-tipping incidents fall across Melton borough

Hundreds of fly-tipping incidents were reported in the Melton borough last year but there were fewer compared to the previous year.
Fly-tipping incidents have fallen in the Melton borough in the last yearFly-tipping incidents have fallen in the Melton borough in the last year
Fly-tipping incidents have fallen in the Melton borough in the last year

Rubbish was discarded at 369 sites during 2021-22, falling from the 399 incidents reported in 2020-21, when residents were observing lockdown restrictions for long periods and more people were exercising in rural areas.

Neighbouring areas Rutland and Charnwood also reported a fall in the number of fly-tipping incidents last year, from 284 to 166 and 1,198 to 878, respectively.

The figures, released by the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), shows this pattern repeated for the east midlands region, with incidents dropping from 90,479 to 79,705 last year.

Rural insurance broker, Lycetts, has urged residents and businesses in the countryside to continue to be vigilant.

Representative, Callum Holland, said: “The figures are very encouraging, but it is important that landowners continue to remain vigilant if the downward trajectory is to continue.

“Making it difficult for environmental criminals to access land is one of the most effective preventative measures you can take.

“Gates should be locked when not in use, fences should be in a good state of repair and hedges should be cut back to allow good visibility for property owners.

“Fly-tippers tend to operate under cover of darkness, so exterior lighting should be installed, if possible. Security cameras can also be an effective deterrent, and can help secure successful prosecutions.”

While local authorities will pay the clean-up costs of clearing waste from public land, farmers and other landowners have responsibility for cleaning and removing waste from private land.

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