No sign of the valuable fiver spent in Melton

World-renowned micro-engraver Graham Short who etched Jane Austen portraits on a limited edition fiver which could be worth more than �20,000 to a lucky Melton shopper after being spent secretly at Ye Olde Pork Pie Shoppe in December 2016. EMN-171101-155129001
World-renowned micro-engraver Graham Short who etched Jane Austen portraits on a limited edition fiver which could be worth more than �20,000 to a lucky Melton shopper after being spent secretly at Ye Olde Pork Pie Shoppe in December 2016. EMN-171101-155129001
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An artist who spent a limited edition £5 note in Melton, which is valued at £50,000, says he is disappointed it hasn’t yet been claimed by someone living in the borough or further afield.

Graham Short etched a tiny portrait of author Jane Austen and a quote from her book Pride and Prejudice.

He then spent it in the Dickinson and Morris Ye Olde Pork Pie Shoppe, in Nottingham Street, in December.

He later announced what he had done and publicised the quote, “I hope I never ridicule what is wise or good,” and the banknote’s serial number AM32 885554.

But no-one has come forward to say they have the note.

The other three fivers he etched with similar designs have all been claimed after being spent in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Mr Short said: “In some ways we’re disappointed that it hasn’t yet been found because we wanted to ensure that people were able to benefit from it, but on the other hand we always knew that these pieces of art could simply enter circulation and end up being passed around people without their knowledge and that is exciting in itself.

“The publicity certainly seemed to work in Scotland, Ireland and Wales because those notes were found within days or weeks, but with England being a larger country it may be that it has travelled some distance and into hands of people who have missed the publicity.”

Mr Short and his associates are continuing to monitor eBay and other auction sites, as well as auction houses to see if anyone attempts to sell the £5 note.

One of the discovered fivers has been retained by the finder’s family for future generations, one was gifted to a university student and the other was returned to him and has been donated to the Children in Need charity.