Work to start next month on rebuilding Melton town centre public toilets

Public toilets in St Mary's Way in Melton which are set to be demolished to make way for upgraded new facilities EMN-181206-103121001
Public toilets in St Mary's Way in Melton which are set to be demolished to make way for upgraded new facilities EMN-181206-103121001
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Delayed work on rebuilding two town centre public toilet blocks in Melton will begin on Monday July 9, it was announced this morning (Tuesday).

Melton Council was due to begin the redevelopment of facilities on St Mary’s Way and Wilton Road back in December but engineering issues with pipework has meant the schemes were put on hold.

Work to build the new toilets on Wilton Road, which will be relocated behind the bus stop in the car park, will be carried out whilst the existing toilets there remain open as usual, while the St Mary’s Way building will be demolished and a new facility built on the same site.

The public will be able to use the toilets at Wilton Road while the building work takes place at both sites and it is hoped the new toilets will be open in December.

Councillor Alan Pearson, chair of the council’s people committee, said: “We have made sure that the contractors are aware that we want to minimise disruption to the public as much as possible while the new facilities are being built so full consideration is being made to the location of equipment and compounds during the demolition and build phases.

“There is likely to be some impact on the car parks where the toilets are located so we will be keep monitoring the public vehicular and pedestrian access as well as coaches and taxi services to ensure minimal disruption.

“The Wilton Road toilets are very popular with many of our tourist visitors that arrive in Melton each year and having modern public conveniences only goes to enhance our already excellent offering for tourism in the Rural Capital of Food.”

The new toilets will each have three unisex cubicles, a pitched roof and a canopy over the entrance doors.

The cubicles will comply with the latest standards for disability access, the council say, and disabled users will be able to use the facilities free of charge by using a RADAR key.

The new semi-automatic public conveniences, which will replace ageing outdated loos, are expected to harness a saving of around £60,000 per year and bring in a revenue of around £30,000.