Solar eclipse casts a shadow over Melton

Shopper Sarah Tarlow uses a plastic folder to view the solar eclipse in Nottingham Street, Melton, with Dickinson and Morris employees Ian Bannatyne, Katie Bird, Carly Thomas and Pete Owen, plus shopper Stephanie Bannerman EMN-150320-103827001
Shopper Sarah Tarlow uses a plastic folder to view the solar eclipse in Nottingham Street, Melton, with Dickinson and Morris employees Ian Bannatyne, Katie Bird, Carly Thomas and Pete Owen, plus shopper Stephanie Bannerman EMN-150320-103827001
0
Have your say

There was an eerie atmosphere in Melton this morning when temperatures dipped and sunlight dimmed as people gathered to take a look at a rare solar eclipse.

It was a perfect day to enjoy this celestial phenomenon - the first big partial eclipse in the UK since 1999 - with a clear sky and burning sun.

And as the clock ticked past 9.30am people came out of their workplaces to join shoppers and other passers-by who were using a variety of basic techniques to safely view the eclipse.

Sarah Tarlow, of Melton, was in Nottingham Street as she held a plastic folder up to the sun and the outline of the partial eclipse could clearly be seen.

“It’s really clear, look,” she exclaimed as excited members of staff from Dickinson and Morris’ Ye Olde Pork Pie Shoppe crowded behind her to see.

Nick Moore, who works in the Timpsons in the town, came out of his shop to look at the eclipse with Malcolm Staples and Barry Simms through a piece of paper without much success.

They had more luck than Melton Times chief reporter Christian March who tried the colander technique to view the phenomenon.

He said: “All I could see on the piece of paper were vegetables, pasta, peas, beans, grapes and fruits!”

Schools in Melton also took part in themed activities during the day.

St Mary’s Primary School watched the magic of the eclipse unfold outside and Year 4 pupils made leaflets about their observations.

St Francis Primary School’s Year 6 students fled the classroom and watched it through their pinhole cameras. They also studied the history and astronomy of how they appear.

Brownlow Primary School held an educational themed day which included watching the BBC live feed, making models of the eclipse, monitoring the temperature drop throughout the action and viewing the sun through their pinhole cameras.

If you have taken any photos or videos of the solar eclipse in the Melton borough please send them to christian.march@meltontimes.co.uk, Tweet @meltontimes or post on our Facebook page at Melton Times.