Last ever chance to see remains of village’s medieval manor

The foundation of a medieval manor house which stood in Croxton Kerrial from the 12th to the 15th century EMN-170717-153506001
The foundation of a medieval manor house which stood in Croxton Kerrial from the 12th to the 15th century EMN-170717-153506001

History buffs will get their last ever chance on Sunday to view the remains of a medieval manor house before it is covered up again and the land restored as a farmer’s field.

The site, near the parish church at Croxton Kerrial, has been explored by archaeologists since being unearthed in 2012.

Excavations have revealed the foundations of the great hall and kitchen, a well, a cattle barn and tithe barn and a blacksmith’s smithy, together with a well preserved medieval toilet.

And guided tours will be given this weekend to show off the site for the final time.

Tony Connolly, who discovered the remnants of the 12th century building in the course of writing a history book about the village said: “It’s probably the most extensive medieval manor house site ever excavated in Leicestershire.

“A small team of us have been on site working on it for five years but it will shortly be covered over again and the sheep will be back in the field.

“We wanted to give people one last chance to see it for themselves so we’ve organised this open day.”

The manor house was occupied by the de Criol family for 150 years - Croxton Kerrial takes the second part of its name from them.

The building was uninhabited from the 1400s after it had been given to the abbey.

It is thought the thatched roof wore away and the walls crumbled with just the foundations now visible.

Those who attend the guided tours, from 11am to 4pm, will also get the chance to see an anglo saxon quarry nearby, where stone was provided for the village’s first St Botolph’s Church.

There will also be medieval and anglo saxon coins, jewellery and pottery on display from recent finds on the sites.

Refreshements will be served throughout the day for an event, which has been organised as part of the nationwide Festival of Archaeology.

Mr Connolly added: “I will be sad to see the medieval manor covered over again in the field.

“But it is nice that we will be able to show it off one more time with these guided tours.”