Cat deaths prompt antifreeze warning

Motorists are urged to check for and clear up any spills of anti-freeze and to make sure they don't leave any open bottles lying around EMN-150312-165427001
Motorists are urged to check for and clear up any spills of anti-freeze and to make sure they don't leave any open bottles lying around EMN-150312-165427001
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The death of two cats which left their owners devastated has prompted a Melton vets to urge people to clean up any spillages of antifreeze and check for any leaks.

Charlotte Aston, a partner at Melton Vets on North Street, said tests confirmed one of the cats had died of antifreeze poisoning and the other was suspected to have died in the same way.

Now she’s urging drivers to check cars aren’t leaking water coolant and to make sure they don’t spill any antifreeze, used in products such as screen wash and de-icers.

She’s also warning cat owners to be vigilant and to call a vet immediately if they notice any signs of poisoning.

She said: “It was sad for us because there was nothing we could do for either of these cats which had already gone into renal failure.

“The best thing is to stop it happening in the first place. At this time of year people will be getting antifreeze out for their cars. They should clean up any spillages, make sure their cars aren’t leaking water coolant and take care storing, using and disposing antifreeze and water coolant.

“Antifreeze is quite attractive to cats and it doesn’t take much if cats ingest it for it to cause kidney failure and death within a couple of days.”

If you suspect your pet has come into contact with antifreeze, leaked water coolant or is showing any of the following symptoms get them to a vet immediately: vomiting, seeming depressed/sleepy, appearing drunk and uncoordinated, seizures (fits) or difficulty breathing.

Signs of antifreeze poisoning can show 30 minutes after ingestion. It can be two to three days before signs of kidney failure are seen.

The sooner your pet receives veterinary treatment, the better their chances of survival.